Hemp News, a compilation of international news stories about hemp and cannabis, is a public service of Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) and THCF Medical Clinics. All material included herein is provided free of charge for political and educational purposes under the US federal "Fair Use Doctrine". This material may only be used for political and educational purposes without express written consent.


California: Legislature Takes A Look At Medical Marijuana Ahead Of Recreational Legalization Vote

RealCaliforniaCannabis

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The likelihood of a 2016 ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana in California is prompting lawmakers in the Golden State to take a serious go at "regulating" the state's large medical marijuana industry, which has existed for 19 years.

Two bills in the California Legislature would create the first statewide regulations for medical cannabis growers, manufacturers of infused products, dispensaries, and delivery services, reports Lisa Leff at the Associated Press.

California voters approved medical marijuana with a 1996 ballot measure allowing doctors to authorize patients to use cannabis for any ailment, deliberately leaving out specifics to allow wider latitude. With advocates now working to qualify recreational adult use initiatives for the November 2016 ballot, the state's medical marijuana industry may soon be losing some of the latitude it has enjoyed for almost two decades.

Last month the Assembly approved a licensing scheme on an overwhelming 62-8 vote. a compromise measure to create a Governor's Office of Medical Cannabis Regulation, AB 266, is endorsed by both the California Cannabis Industry Association and the California Police Chiefs Association, which, as you might imagine, don't often find themselves agreeing.

Oregon: Thriving Hash Oil Market Skyrockets Demand For Marijuana Trim

BHOShatterSlab[NWCannabisNursery.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Many of us can remember just a few years ago when it wasn't too hard to find free marijuana "trim," the leaves snipped from harvested cannabis flowers. Hell, quite a few growers had so much of the stuff, they threw it in the trash. How times have changed.

Trim has become a lucrative element of the cannabis economy in places like newly legal Oregon, where it's become a sought-after commodity in the state's thriving market for cannabis concentrates and infused edibles, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian.

Trim has gone from free, almost being considered garbage, to fetching up to $400 a pound in Oregon. While $50 a pound was the norm just a couple years ago, $250 is closer to average now. (Cannabis flowers typically sell from $1,400 to $3,000 a pound on Oregon's wholesale market.)

One of the under-examined aspects of this green rush is the fact that it's made it much more difficult for cancer patients and their families to find full extract cannabis oil (FECO), popularly known as "Rick Simpson Oil" or RSO, because that same trim which would have gone into making FECO through an alcohol extraction process is now often diverted into making butane hash oil (BHO), favored by many recreational consumers.

Arizona: Marijuana Legalization Backers Outraged By Erroneous Op-Ed On Tax Revenue

ArizonaCampaignToRegulateLikeMarijuanaLikeAlcohol40Million[RaySternPhoenixNewTimes]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Backers of a plan to legalize marijuana in Arizona are outraged over an unsigned editorial in the Arizona Republic published on August 21 using inaccurate tax revenue figures to back its claim that campaign leaders are lying.

After being notified of the error by the Phoenix New Times, the Republic later issued a correction, reports Ray Stern.

The op-ed was responding to a claim made by the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol's message from August 19 at the state Capitol that its planned November 2016 ballot measure, if passed, could bring in $40 million or more annually to Arizona public schools.

The measure in question would create a system of retail cannabis stores where adults 21 and older would pay a 15 percent tax on marijuana sales. After taking the money needed to run a new bureaucracy to oversee that system, 80 percent of the remaining tax revenue would go to funding kindgartens and public schools.

The unsigned editorial claims the legalization campaign's figure is a "lie," suggesting that backers of the measure might be so high on weed that they'd try to deposit the fake check they used for a prop.

Arizona: Cannabis Expo Offers Free Admission For Dispensary and Cultivation Owners In SW

KatherineGrimmHighProfits[Twitter]

Regional dispensary and cultivation center owners will receive free admission to the inaugural Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo (SWCCE) on October 27 and 28 at the Phoenix Convention Center, according to Rory Mendoza, executive director of the first-ever cannabis convention in Arizona.

The complimentary admission tickets are provided through a partnership with MJ Freeway and event organizers and must be reserved online at www.swccexpo.com by October 15. Licensed dispensary and cultivation center owners from Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and Southern California may qualify.

“Education and community are a cornerstone of our industry,” said Amy Poinsett, cofounder and CEO of MJ Freeway. "Conferences like the Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo help ensure all regions have access to events that foster leadership, education and community-building.

"MJ Freeway gladly supports the advancement of the cannabis industry through our sponsorship of these types of events," Poinsett said. "The SWCCE is special because cannabis-business owners, the heart of the industry, receive free admission to the event."

MJ Freeway markets seed-to-sale tracking software, with patent-pending inventory control and grow management applications for cannabis businesses. The company provides technology that delivers solutions and compliance accountability for producers, processors, manufacturers, and retailers.

Colorado: Patients Sue Over Board's Decision Not To Allow Marijuana For PTSD

PTSD-Marijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Five PTSD patients on Thursday filed suit in Denver District Court challenging last month's decision by the Colorado Board of Health not to make post-traumatic stress disorder the first condition added to the state's medical marijuana eligibility list in 15 years.

The rejection came despite a recommendation from Colorado's chief medical officer and a panel of physicians.They said that some questions about marijuana's effectiveness as a treatment for PTSD, but that people are using cannabis anyway and the medical inclusion would allow more understanding of how people use marijuana to treat stress related issues.

The Board of Health, however, claimed there is insufficient federal research and denied the PTSD request on a 6-2 vote.

"The board in effect established a standard that was impossible to meet," said Bob Hoban, an attorney for the PTSD patients. "They insist on having a federal study, which in effect is a futile standard."

Authorities have three weeks to respond to the complaint, with no hearing date set. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is also named in the study; a spokeswoman for that department on Friday declined to comment.

Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older in Colorado, with no medical authorization needed. But medical marijuana is taxed at 2.9 percent, compared with at least 25 percent for recreational weed. Also, medical marijuana patients are legally allowed to possess two ounces of weed instead of just one.

Wisconsin: Menominee Tribe Approves Recreational, Medical Marijuana In Advisory Vote

Menominee-LandOfTheMenominee[Indianz.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A proposal to grow marijuana for medical and/or recreational purposes on Thursday passed an advisory referendum vote by the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin.

The tribe said the results aren't binding, but advisory in nature, meaning the vote doesn't change the Tribal Controlled Substance Ordinance, reports Clare Kaley at WBAY. If the proposal is taken up at the tribal legislature level, the panel would need to amend the ordinance.

The tribe said it would take input from tribal members before creating a new ordinance for the use of marijuana.

After Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker rejected a proposal for the tribe to build a casino in Kenosha, some members say marijuana is a way for the tribe to make some extra money.

"We want to do more for our people, but every situation we come up with gets denied or whatever," said Menominee tribe member Daylene Gladue. "If it came down to this now, then it had to be."

If the tribe approves growing marijuana it may only be available to tribal members, and will only allowed on tribal land. Tribal Chairman Gary Besaw noted it is an "open question" whether the tribe would be allowed to sell marijuana to non-Indians on the reservation.

The tribe said certain factors will be considered if it moves forward with the proposal. "Things like making sure minors do not have access to it, gangs are not involved in it, and that it does not go outside of the reservation to places where it's illegal," Besaw said.

U.S.: Hemp Industries Association Presenting 22nd Annual Conference Sept. 27-29

HempIndustriesAssociation(HIA)

Hemp Industries Association (HIA), a non-profit trade association consisting of hundreds of hemp businesses and farmers, has announced will host its annual conference Sunday, September 27 through Tuesday, September 29, at the Hilton Hotel in downtown Lexington, Kentucky.

The three-day conference will feature keynote speaker James Comer, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner, and expert speakers David Mitlin, professor at Clarkson University, David Williams, agronomist at University of Kentucky, Mike Fata, CEO of Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods, Ethan Russo, MD, medical director at Phytecs, John Roulac, CEO of Nutiva, plus many others.

Focusing on the expansion of the hemp industry and market in North America, the conference will also feature hemp exhibits, networking opportunities, and a hemp farm tour.

WHAT: Hemp Industries Association 22nd Annual Conference

WHEN: Sunday, September 27 – Tuesday, September 29, 2015

WHERE: Hilton Hotel, Downtown Lexington
369 West Vine Street
Lexington, KY 40507

Held for the first time in Kentucky, the 22nd annual conference occurs at a bright moment in hemp history, as hemp is cultivated in numerous research projects and farms throughout the state.

Exceeding $620 million in retail sales, according to SPINS data and HIA estimates, hemp products are demonstrating significant market growth; with 21.2 percent year over year growth for the category of hemp foods and body care products alone.

Oregon: Odor of Marijuana Smoke From Neighbor's Apartment Not Legally Offensive, Court Rules

SmokingMarijuana[StuffByCher]

"We are not prepared to declare that the odor of marijuana smoke is equivalent to the odor of garbage," the appeals court wrote. "Indeed, some people undoubtedly find the scent pleasing."

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Oregon Court of Appeals on Wednesday refused to declare the smell of marijuana smoke drifting into neighbors' homes as "unpleasant."

The appeals court ruled that marijuana smoke isn't necessary offensive to all people, although rotten eggs or raw sewage are physically offensive odors to everyone, reports Aimee Green at The Oregonian.

"We are not prepared to declare that the odor of marijuana smoke is equivalent to the odor of garbage," the appeals court wrote. "Indeed, some people undoubtedly find the scent pleasing."

With the appeals court ruling, recreational cannabis users in Oregon may rest assured that smoking weed at home shouldn't result in any law enforcement hassles.

The appeals court ruling came in the case of Jared William Lang, who was 34 in November 2012 when an officer with the Philomath Police Department came to his apartment after neighbors on both sides reported the smell of marijuana coming from his unit. One person claimed "that the smell was especially difficult for him because he was currently attending rehabilitation for drug use and the smell of marijuana was a 'trigger' for him," according to an appeals court summary.

California: Melissa Etheridge Confirmed As Keynote At Cannabis World Congress

MelissaEtheridge[VeryImportantPotheads.com]

Melissa Etheridge, Grammy and Academy Award winning singer-songwriter, will be a keynote speaker during the Cannabis World Congress & Business Exposition (CWCBExpo), September 16-18 at the Los Angeles Convention Center in Los Angeles.

Etheridge's much anticipated keynote address will take place on Thursday, September 17, at 2 pm. The CWCBExpo in LA is an event for the legalized and medical marijuana industries.

“I was extremely honored to be asked to speak at the CWCBExpo because as a cancer survivor, who discovered the unparalleled medical benefits of cannabis during my recovery, I feel very passionate about helping to remove the negative stigma and educating people about its real medicinal value,” said Etheridge.

“We are thrilled to have Melissa Etheridge Keynote at CWCBExpo in LA,” said Christine Ianuzzi, managing partner of Leading Edge Expositions, LLC, and show director for CWCBExpo. "Not only is she an iconic rock star, but also a very successful entrepreneur and advocate within the legalized cannabis industry. Her historic keynote will be enormously well received and very captivating."

Known for her confessional lyrics and raspy, smoky vocals, Melissa has remained one of America’s favorite female singer-songwriters for more than two decades. She began her distinguished musical career in 1988 when she stormed onto the American rock scene with the release of her critically acclaimed self-titled debut album.

Oregon: Draft Rules Issued For Recreational Marijuana Sales

OregonWhatsLegalEducationBeforeYouRecreate[Oregon.gov]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Oregon marijuana dispensaries that plan to make recreational sales to people 21 and older must first tell the state health authority and record the birthdates of shoppers, along with the quantities of cannabis they buy, under draft rules issued Wednesday.

Marijuana dispensaries are also required to prominently post a sign at the entrance letting consumers know they are either serving both the medical and the recreational market, or that they are a medical-only shop, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian.

The guidelines for early recreational sales are the first of several sets of rules to be crafted by the Oregon Health Authority for the marijuana program, according to program administrator Steve Wagner. The agency will also issue rules for processors, growers, testing labs, serving sizes, and labeling, according to Wagner.

Recreational sales are set to begin on October 1 in medical marijuana dispensaries which choose to become a part of the program. Wagner said the public, including dispensary owners, will have about one week to comment on the rules.

Also in the draft rules:

• Dispensary staff members must distribute with every recreational marijuana purchase a state-issued information card about cannabis.

Arizona: Marijuana Legalization Initiative Could Raise $40 Million Annually For Education

ArizonaRegulateMarijuanaLikeAlcohol2016

Backers of a proposed 2016 ballot initiative to regulate and tax marijuana like alcohol estimate the measure would raise more than $40 million annually for education in Arizona. The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol highlighted the potential revenue Wednesday by presenting the state with a jumbo-sized check during a “back-to-school” news conference in front of the state capitol.

“Our schools are in serious need of funding, and taxing marijuana would create a significant new revenue stream,” said State Sen. Martin Quezada, a member of the Pendergast Elementary School District Governing Board who spoke at the news conference. “Marijuana sales are going to keep taking place regardless of whether this initiative passes or fails. But only if it passes will they raise tens of millions of dollars each year for public education in Arizona.”

The proposed initiative would enact a 15 percent excise tax on marijuana sales from licensed retail stores to adults 21 years of age and older, which would be used to fund the implementation and enforcement of regulations. Of any additional tax revenue collected, 40 percent would be allocated to the Department of Education for school construction, maintenance, and operating costs, and 40 percent would be allocated to the Department of Education for full-day kindergarten programs.

Study: Nicotine Changes The Way Marijuana Affects The Brain

MaybeIt'sTimeYouSwitchedToWeed[MassCentral]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Nicotine changes the way marijuana affects the brain, according to a new study from scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas.

When marijuana and tobacco are combined, according to the study, which was published in the journal Behavioural Brain Research, memory gets stronger as the hippocampus, an area of the brain which affects learning ability and memory, gets smaller, reports Sean Martin at the International Business Times. The more cigarettes smoked per day, the smaller the size of the hippocampus, and the greater the memory performance, according to the research.

The team concluded that the effects of marijuana on the brain aren't usually analyzed with tobacco taken into consideration. The research team was led by Francesca Filbey, director of cognitive neuroscience of addictive behaviors at the Center for BrainHealth.

"Approximately 70 percent of individuals who use marijuana also use tobacco," Filbey said (although I'd question that number). "Our findings exemplify why the effects of marijuana on the brain may not generalize to the vast majority of the marijuana using population, because most studies do not account for tobacco use. This study is one of the first to tease apart the unique effects of each substance on the brain as well as their combined effects.

Washington: Top Marijuana Advisor Steps Down

RandySimmons[JohnLok-TheSeattleTimes]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The bureaucrat who helped implement Washington state's recreational marijuana law -- and dismantle the state's medical marijuana program -- is stepping down.

Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington State Liquor Control Board, said this year's "difficult" legislative session played a factor in his decision, reports Bob Young at The Seattle Times.

Battles erupted as monied I-502 business investors lobbied the Washington Legislature to "fold" the state's medical marijuana industry into the recreational side; that happened, effectively channeling all patients through I-502 stores and shutting down access through medical dispensaries statewide. It was an unappetizing spectacle, with 502 merchants picking over the remains of the medical marijuana community, looking for more profits.

"It was a hard legislative session," Young complained, evidently feeling patients should have uncomplainingly been led down the primrose path of eliminating medical dispensaries. "I felt tired of all the battles going on."

Simmons, 63, is leaving his job at the Liquor and Cannabis Control Board at the end of August to take a senior administrator's job at the Washington Department of Revenue. He said he's looking forward to a less stressful job.

Ohio: Buckeye State Could Become First In Midwest To Legalize Marijuana

OhioMarijuanaLeaf

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Ohio could become the fifth state, and the first in the Midwest, to legalize marijuana under a measure that qualified on Wednesday for the state's November 2015 ballot. The measure itself, however, remains controversial, as it basically hands control of the state's legal cannabis industry to a handful of entrepreneurs.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted rules that ResponsibleOhio advocates and hired workers gathered enough valid signatures -- more than 320,000 -- to qualify, reports Jackie Borchardt at the Northeast Ohio Media Group.

The measure will appear as Issue 3 on the statewide ballot for the general election on November 3.

"It's time for marijuana legalization in Ohio, and voters will have the opportunity to make it happen this November -- we couldn't be more excited," said ResponsibleOhio Executive Director Ian James. "Drug dealers don't care about doing what's best for our state and its citizens.

"By reforming marijuana laws in November, we'll provide compassionate care to sick Ohioans, bring money back to our local communities and establish a new industry with limitless economic development opportunities."

If the measure passes, Ohio would become the first state to legalize recreational marijuana without having legalized medicinal cannabis first.

Oregon: TV Station Pulls Marijuana Commercial That Would Have Been Nation's First

NoMarijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana advertisements apparently still aren't quite ready for prime time TV.

What would have been the first cannabis commercial on network television anywhere in the United States was scheduled to air Wednesday on KATU-TV in Portland, Oregon, reports Molly Harbbarger at The Oregonian. During the evening news broadcast, the Oregon Medical Marijuana Business Conference had planned to solicit attendees.

But KATU General Manager John Tamerlano said on Tuesday the station had decided to pull the ad, reports Willamette Week. Tamerlano flatly said the station "doesn't accept marijuana advertising."

A Denver TV station had made the same decision last month. KMGH-Channel 7 had planned to air ads for companies operating dispensaries and also for vape pen manufacturers, but the station eventually blinked because of pot's continued illegality under federal law.

Recreational cannabis became legal in Oregon on July 1. Commercial sales to adults will start in medical dispensaries on October 1.

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