Activism

U.S.: NORML Trying To Win Super Bowl Ad For Marijuana Spot

IntuitSmallBusinessBigGame

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws is trying, through social media, to win online voting for a contest that will award a Super Bowl ad to a small business. But the odds are long for the cannabis advocacy group, according to some observers.

"[A]nyone who thinks a marijuana advocacy ad will run during the game on Fox this February may be smoking something already," wrote Jack Neff of Ad Age. "That doesn't mean the parties involved mind the publicity being stirred up."

Intuit is holding the contest; the company said in July that it would give one small business a 30-second ad during the Super Bowl. But when NORML entered the contest, it set off a burst of media attention and raised questions about what, exactly, is a "small business."

Uniliver's vice president of media for the Americas, Rob Master, tweeted to former Intuit Quickbooks marketing executive Seth Greenberg, who launched the contest, that it is "creating tons of buzz around potential marijuana ad winner -- definition of earned media."

Greenberg, who left Intuit in July to become chief marketing officer of Lifelock, replied: "That's one type of 'buzz' we didn't expect."

Missouri: Lawmakers Eye Push For Marijuana Law Reform

MissouriStateRepresentativeChrisKelly

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Missouri lawmakers who want to relax the state's marijuana laws are looking at a renewed push for reforms. House Democrats Chris Kelly of Columbia and Rory Ellinger of Universal City were among the speakers at a Thursday forum on cannabis policy.

Reps. Kelly and Ellinger both supported legislation earlier this year which would have reduced marijuana possession penalties to a low-level misdemeanor with no jail time, similar to a traffic ticket, reports CBS St. Louis. St. Louis and Columbia already have such decriminalization ordinances on the books.

Rep. Kelly said he would also favor full legalization only if there were enough organizational support from pro-marijuana groups, reports The Columbia Missourian.

Kelly said he wasn't sure if it would be better to seek legislative approval of lower marijuana penalties, or to put any proposed reforms on a statewide ballot to let the voters decide for themselves.

(Photo of Rep. Chris Kelly: ChrisKelly24.com)

Arizona: 25-Mile Law Restricting Homegrown Medical Marijuana Is Challenged

No25MileRule

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An attorney representing Arizona's top health official says that a constitutional right to control your own health care does not mean that medical marijuana patients have the right to grow their own cannabis.

Attorney Gregory Falls, representing Arizona Health Director Will Humble, is asking Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Katherine Cooper to throw out claims by two men that, as legally registered medical marijuana patients, they are constitutionally entitled to plant, grow and harvest their own supply, reports Howard Fischer ofCapitol Media Services in the Arizona Daily Star.

According to Falls, the fact that Arizona voters allowed those with a doctor's authorization to obtain and use cannabis does not mean patients can ignore other provisions of the medical marijuana law. The law approved by voters in 2010 says patients living within 25 miles of the nearest state-licensed dispensary have to buy their marijuana from the store.

The ability for nearly 40,000 Arizona medical marijuana patients statewide to legally grow their own hangs on the outcome of the battle. A decision against Humble would mean each of them has the right to grow up to 12 plants.

Michigan: Medical Marijuana Advocates Protest Removal Of Lansing Baby From Home

MariaSteveGreenFreeBreeRally

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Groups supporting Michigan's medical marijuana law are joining forces to protest the case of a six-month-old Lansing girl who was removed from her home after a complain involving medical marijuana use by her parents.

Dozens of people held signs and chanted "Free Bree" outside the Grand Tower in Lansing on Tuesday to protest the Michigan Department of Human Services' removal of Brielle Green from parents Steve and Maria Green, reports Ken Palmer at the Lansing State Journal.

"These are good parents, good loving parents," said Charmie Gholson, founder of Michigan Moms United, one of the groups organizing Tuesday's press conference.

The Green case is among dozens in which state case workers have ignored patient protections in the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act while trying to remove children from parents who are registered medical marijuana patients or caregivers, according to Gholson.

"There's nowhere to go when (Children's Protective Services) does this," Gholson said. "When they took Bree on Friday, that really was the last straw."

An Ingham County Family Court referee, acting on a petition by CPS case workers, on Friday ordered the infant removed from her parents' home because her mother -- a registered, legal medical marijuana caregiver -- had cannabis in the house, according to the groups.

U.S.: Tax Reformers Detail Needed Changes to Marijuana Business Taxes

AmericansForTaxReform

Grover Norquist and Representative Earl Blumenauer identify unjust application of tax code for legal marijuana businesses at press conference with the National Cannabis Industry Association

Representative Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) president Grover Norquist, and National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA) executive director Aaron Smith held a press conference on Thursday to mark the release of a new white paper from ATR entitled "Legal Cannabis Dispensary Taxation: A Textbook Case of Punishing Law-Abiding Businesses Through the Tax Code." The paper calls for reform of Internal Revenue Code Section 280E, which essentially forces medical marijuana providers to pay taxes based on gross receipts rather than income, unlike all other small businesses.

Additionally, the paper details Americans for Tax Reform’s endorsement of H.R. 2240, the Small Business Tax Equity Act, introduced earlier this year by Rep. Blumenauer and strongly supported by the NCIA. Norquist also sent a letter explaining his support for H.R. 2240 to House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp.

New Zealand: Country's First Cannabis Museum Opening

JulianCrawfordAbeGrayAotearoaLegaliseCannabis

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

New Zealand's first cannabis museum is opening, featuring more than 100 books, articles, photographs and displays. The facility also includes space for community groups, recording facilities, and a movie projector.

Legalise Cannabis House in Dunedin, where the museum is located, is becoming the national headquarters of the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party and includes a broadcasting studio and computer equipment for running the organization's political campaigns.

"Cannabis is such a taboo subject, but New Zealand has the highest [cannabis consumption] rate in the Western world per percentage of population; we are like the most stoner country in the West," said Legalise Cannabis House Manager Abe Gray, reports Hamish McNeilly at the Otago Daily Times.

Gray stressed that no marijuana is on display, but users are encouraged to visit Dunedin's 4:20 protests which are featured in the museum.

"There will be no cannabis smoked or sold in the house," Gray said. "There will only be information."

The protests began on the campus of the University of Otago in mid-2004 when people began gathering under a walnut tree near the Union Building at 4:20 p.m. each Friday to support cannabis law reform.

"We had to have a museum because we had so much memorabilia about the 4:20s," Gray said.

The protests were a magnet for tourists, and the museum is likely to draw crowds, as well, according to Gray.

Colorado: Hundreds Line Up For Free Joints In Marijuana Tax Protest

FreeJointsDenver

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hundreds of excited people lined up in Denver's Civic Center Park on Monday to get a free joint, as part of a protest against Colorado's plan to heavily tax recreational marijuana.

The protest was courtesy of the No On Proposition AA campaign, which opposes a plan calling for a 10 percent sales tax on recreational cannabis with the option of going as high as 15 percent (with an additional 15 percent excise tax), reports CBS Denver.

According to spokesman Robert Corry, an attorney who represents clients in the medical marijuana business, state leaders are backing a plan that over-taxes cannabis sales, and that's not what voters approved when they passed Amendment 64 last November.

"We have one of the leading alcohol industries in the world here in our state with less than a one percent tax," Corry said. "That's what the marijuana tax ought to be. That's what we support."

Supporters of Proposition AA, including Denver City Councilman Charlie Brown, claim the money is necessary for "proper regulation" of cannabis.

"We will all be affected by this industry and we need to be ready for it -- administratively, from the police perspective and from a public health perspective, and that's what we need this money for," Brown claimed.

Colorado: Pro-Marijuana Group Places Billboard Outside Denver Broncos' Mile High Stadium

StopDrivingPlayersToDrink(MPPMileHighBillboard)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A huge pro-marijuana billboard now greets visitors to Mile High Stadium, home of the Denver Broncos, thanks to the Marijuana Policy Project.

MPP is continuing its strategy of advertising at our near popular American sports events with the billboard purchase just outside Sports Authority Field at Mile High, reports Dan Carson at Bleacher Report.

"Stop Driving Players To Drink," the billboard scolds the National Football League, referring to the NFL's policy of punishing players for smoking marijuana, but allowing alcohol use.

"NFL players are being told that they can go out and get completely drunk, but face no punishment from the leagues," MPP spokesman Mason Tvert said. "But if a player gets caught using marijuana, they could be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars, forced to sit out games and deemed a troublemaker."

MPP had attempted to air a promotional video at the Indianapolis Speedway in July during the Brickyard 400, but the ad was pulled before the race began.

MPP reportedly paid $5,000 for the ad space. The billboard is located one block west of the stadium.

Colorado voters, like those in Washington state, last November legalized marijuana for adults. Last week, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said the federal government won't interfere with the state laws legalizing cannabis -- at least not right now.

U.S.: Groups Call on Congress to Hold Hearings on the DEA

PoliceSWAT

Sign-On Letter Highlights Numerous Recent DEA Scandals: Secret Use of NSA and CIA Surveillance Records, Unfettered Access to Citizens’ Phone Records, and Many More

Signatories Call on Congress to Hold the DEA Accountable for Systematic, Illegal Practices

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

More than 120 groups from across the political spectrum and around the globe, including the ACLU, Witness for Peace, Drug Policy Alliance, and the International Drug Policy Consortium (a global network of 106 NGOs) sent a letter to Congress on Thursday, calling on key legislators from the House and Senate Judiciary and Oversight Committees to hold hearings on the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

“For too long Congress has given the DEA a free pass,” said Bill Piper, director of national affairs at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). “Our hope is that Congress does its job and provides oversight because this agency has a deeply troubling track record of unregulated and out of control behavior. The DEA must be reined in and held accountable.”

The catalyst for the letter is a series of investigative articles from early August and September by Reuters and The New York Times. The Reuters articles outline how the DEA has used certain CIA and NSA programs to pursue drug convictions in the United States. The revelations have added to the current controversy surrounding NSA programs.

Australia: HEMP Party Calls For Cannabis To Be Legalized

HEMPPartyOfAustralia

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Australia's HEMP Party -- Help End Marijuana Prohibition -- launched its election campaign on Monday, calling for cannabis to be legalized for personal and medical use, as it is now for industrial purposes.

Members of HEMP inflated a 33-foot plastic replica of a joint outside the state police commissioner's office in Sydney, reports Stuart McDill for Reuters. Activists said Australia's jails were "overflowing" with people criminalized for no good reason.

"America has given us huge encouragement," HEMP president Michael Balderstone said. "Half of America now has access to medical cannabis and now they've started to get new regulations for recreational cannabis. So, you know, the wall is down there and no big deal, the place hasn't gone crazy."

Cancer patient Jenn Lea handed out HEMP Party leaflets to amused office workers enjoying the lunchtime sunshine in a city park. The leaflets call for Parliament to end what Lea called discrimination against cannabis users.

Lea, a mother of three who has breast cancer, said she would not be alive if not for cannabis oil, and said she only wants to be able to buy it without breaking the law.

"Disgusted at my country but I'm proud that I've finally taken some initiative and I'm fighting for my rights to medicate," Lea said. "I want to live. I don't want to be put off in some respite center to die. I'm 35. I have children. I want to be there."

Colorado: Moms For Marijuana Activist Jenny Kush Killed By Drunk Driver

JennyKushFacebook

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A widely recognized marijuana activist was killed on a highway near Denver, Colorado, early Saturday morning, by a drunk driver with a long record of DUI arrests.

Jenny Kush, 34, the mother of four and a founding member of Moms For Marijuana, died after an SUV in which she was a passenger was struck head-on by a vehicle driving the wrong way in the HOV lane on Interstate 25 in the Denver area, reports Jonathan Vankin at Opposing Views.

The drunken driver, Rebecca Maez, 27, was reportedly too intoxicated to notice she had gone the wrong way up the exit ramp onto I-25. She was driving south in the northbound HOV lane when her car hit the vehicle driven by Kush's boyfriend just after midnight as the couple returned home from a concert.

Maez now faces charges of vehicular homicide in addition to another drunk driving violation.

"I had actually just talked to her about 10 minutes before the wreck happened," Paul Garrett, a friend of Kush's, told CBS Denver. "They were at a concert downtown. She was telling me about the t-shirt she got and how much fun she had had."

Kush's boyfriend, identified by activist "Rx MaryJane" as Jeremy Charles, was injured in the crash been has been released from the hospital.

New Zealand: Sentence Halved for Medical Marijuana Activist

BillyMcKeeNewZealandCannabisActivist

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A medical marijuana activist in New Zealand has had his home detention sentence cut in half after a hearing in the Court of Appeal.

Activist William McKee, 58, was originally sentenced to 12 months' home detention, reports the Aeotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party (ALCP). He promoted the medical use of marijuana through a website called GreenCross, which seeks a change in the law to make cannabis available for medicinal purposes.

A police investigation was reportedly prompted by activity on the site about selling and distributing cannabis.

An undercover police officer made several cannabis purchases, totaling $305, over four months after initially contacting McKee in February 2010.

McKee has known the value of medical marijuana for 37 years now, since the amputation of one leg after he was injured in a hit-and-run accident just after his 21st birthday. Before and after the amputation, he found that self-medicating with cannabis brought him the most effective relief.

According to McKee, the undercover officer had talked him into selling the cannabis by claiming severe headaches. McKee had unsuccessful tried to get the officer to become a GreenCross cardholder, which would have given the policeman a medical exemption.

McKee told the court the small sales he made, after much "wheedling" from the undercover officer, should have been regarded as entrapment.

New Zealand: Cannabis Advocate Runs For Mayor

DaktaGreenTokingJoint

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

New Zealand cannabis legalization advocate Dakta Green, who's been jailed two times for possession of marijuana, has entered the race for mayor of the Ruapehu District.

Green, 63, is back in his home town of Taumarunui after a 40-year absence and said he wants to make a mark, reports Merania Karauria at The New Zealand Herald. The activist has bought the former freezing works administration centre, and wants to turn it into a museum.

The mayoral candidate is also the founder of New Zealand's most visible cannabis club, The Daktory. His motto is "Live like it's legal."

"Alcohol and tobacco are dangerous drugs but are legally available," Green said in 2010. "Cannabis causes less harm to our community."

"The cannabis laws are wrong," Green said. "They are fueled by a pernicious prejudice and perpetuate harmful stereotypes that adversely affect users and their families."

According to Green, cannabis is more natural, healthier option than other drugs, and does not fuel crime. "You smoke a joint right now, you're not going to all of a sudden going to be overcome with the urge to go out and rob a bank or belt somebody over the head," he said. "There's nothing within cannabis that turns you into a criminal."

Global: Leafly.com Unveils Mainstream Cannabis News and Information Section

LeaflyBlueDream

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Leafly.com has introduced a cannabis news and culture section, covering topics ranging from industry news to advocacy efforts and resources for people new to cannabis, including FAQs, how-to guides, advice for choosing a dispensary, and a dispensary patient "bill of rights."

Described as "Yelp for medical cannabis patients," Leafly is designed to help patients find the marijuana strains and dispensaries for their medical needs through an online environment. The site features more than 50,000 patient-generated reviews of more than 500 strains of cannabis, along with 22,000 patient reviews of 3,300 dispensaries in the United States, Canada, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Israel.

"This is a big step forward for cannabis patients," said Christian Groh, vice president of sales and Leafly and partner of Privateer Holdings. "Expanding Leafly's education and information resources will allow patients to make informed decisions about their treatment in a mainstream, professional environment."

To lead the expansion, Leafly hired Rebecca Kelley as its new Content & Community manager. Kelley brings almost a decade of experience in online content development and marketing to the Leafly team.

In her new role, Kelley will oversee a team of four content creators tasked with developing Leafly into a news and culture resource for cannabis patients. Previously, she served as content marketing manager for Intego (an industry leader in Mac antivirus and security software), and also held similar positions at This or That Media, and SEOmoz.

Hempstalk Is Coming To Portland September 7-8

PortlandHempstalkPoster2013

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Portland Hempstalk, one of the best loved cannabis festivals in the Pacific Northwest, is scheduled for September 7 and 8 at Kelley Point Park, at the confluence of the Willamette & Columbia Rivers in Oregon.

Hempstalk is in a bucolic, rural setting just outside the city; Kelley Point Park is quite secluded, and attendees must traverse trails to get to the event itself, but golf carts run a constant shuttle service between the gate and the event.

One striking thing about Hempstalk is the degree of enthusiasm shown by those who have attended; if they’ve ever been one time, folks plan to go back.

“Hempstalk is awesome,” Seattle activist Jared Allaway, known for giving out “Marijuana Is Safer Than Alcohol” t-shirts, told Hemp News. “They have a great location on the water with multiple stages for entertainment, great vendors, and great info debates. The hospitality is awesome!”

Another prominent Seattle activist, Renae Ely, agreed; 2012 was her first experience with Hempstalk. “Coming shortly after the mind-blowing hugeness that is Seattle Hempfest, I wasn’t sure just what to expect,” Ely told us. “After a long and leisurely stroll into Kelley Point Park, I was pleasantly surprised to find a sizable (yet not overwhelming) hemp and cannabis event happening!

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