directeffect charities

Illinois: Widow Who Pushed For Medical Marijuana Not Allowed To Use It Under New Law

ILGovPatQuinnAndMichelleDiGiacomo

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Michelle DiGiacomo of Chicago won't be allowed to use medical marijuana under the new law in Illinois -- because she used medical marijuana before the law passed.

When police stormed DiGiacomo's North Side Chicago apartment last year, she had known the day could come, since marijuana was still illegal in Illinois even for medical reasons. But she was still unprepared.

"I was about to experience the worst 28 hours of my life," said DiGiacomo, 53, who runs Direct Effect Charities, which serves needy Chicago Public Schools kids, reports Maudlyne Ihejirika at the Chicago Sun-Times. "We had discussed this possibility in the past; one I had hoped would never come to be."

The widowed mother had used marijuana for the past five years to control the pain of fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal stenosis and rotator cuff disease. Pharmaceuticals had resulted in adverse reactions, or had failed to provide relief.

After he September 13, 2012 arrest, she pleaded guilty on March 5 to Class 4 felony possession of marijuana, just five months before Gov. Pat Quinn signed the state's medical marijuana bill into law.

Now she's not allowed to take part in the program, because under the Illinois Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Program Act, a felony conviction disqualifies her from accessing medical marijuana. Advocates say the story highlights the new law's shortcomings.

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