Recreational

Uruguay: Citizens Can Now Register To Grow Marijuana At Home

UruguayFlagMarijuana

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Uruguayans who want to grow their own marijuana are able to register with the government to legally do so, as of Wednesday, when the government there launched the latest phase of its cannabis legalization program.

Under a law that went into effect in May, citizens or legal residents who are 18 or older can grow marijuana for personal use if they register, reports France 24. The limit is six female plants, with an annual harvest of up to 480 grams.

Only 10 people had registered with the government by midday on Wednesday to become private marijuana growers. Three of them were in the capital city, Montevideo, and seven in Uruguay's interior, according to the newly created Institute for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis (IRCCA).

Marijuana activist Juan Vaz said he registered, and the process was easy, but added that he can understand why some people might be reluctant.

"There are some people who might feel persecuted," Vaz said. "For many years, they grew plants in secret and it's hard to break from that way of thinking."

Uruguay is the first country in the modern world to fully legalize the production, sale and distribution of cannabis. The law, passed by Uruguay's Parliament in December 2013, also allows growers and users to form clubs, and permits pharmacies to sell up to 40 grams of marijuana per month to registered users.

Maine: Activists To Submit Final Petition For Initiative To Legalize Marijuana In York

DavidBoyerCitizensForASaferMaine

Citizens for a Safer Maine will submit its petition Wednesday in support of a citizen initiative to make private marijuana possession legal for adults 21 years of age and older in the Town of York. York Selectman Ronald Nowell will join initiative backers at a media availability at 2 p.m. ET in front of York Town Hall prior to submitting the petition to the Town Clerk’s Office.

Citizens for a Safer Maine collected more than 900 total signatures, and just 641 valid signatures of registered town voters are needed to qualify for the ballot.

In July, the group submitted more than 100 signatures in order to place the measure in front of the York Board of Selectmen. On July 28, it voted 3-2 against putting the measure on the ballot, giving Citizens for a Safer Maine 30 days to collect the additional 600-plus signatures.

The initiative would make it legal for adults 21 years of age and older to privately possess up to one ounce of marijuana. It would remain illegal to consume or display marijuana in public.

The measure also includes a statement in support of regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol at the state level. A similar measure will appear on the November ballot in South Portland, and one is expected to be placed on the ballot in Lewiston following a city council hearing next week.

Oregon: Group Cancels Taxpayer-Funded Anti-Marijuana Summit After Complaints

KevinSabetAtPodium

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A taxpayer-funded anti-drug group has canceled an October summit in Madras, Oregon, after complaints were raised by sponsors of Measure 91, a ballot measure which would legalize marijuana for recreational purposes. The event, like 12 other local appearances, was scheduled just before the November vote.

The summit was to feature Kevin Sabet, a prominent opponent of cannabis legalization, reports Jeff Mapes at The Oregonian. Sponsors of Measure 91 this week charged that it was wrong for organizers to use federal funds to help pay for an appearance by Sabet, a former White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) adviser who has formed Smarter Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), an anti-pot organization.

The taxpayer-funded "Oregon Marijuana Education Tour" was billed as a supposedly non-political event, since it would likely violate campaign rules for funds to be used for political purposes -- and this was flagrantly scheduled for just before the marijuana vote. Sabet had claimed that he wouldn't talk about the ballot measure on the tour.

The summit was canceled because he "could see from an outside perspective that it could look like a conflict," admitted Rick Treleaven, executive director of BestCare Treatment Practices and organizer of the event.

Colorado: CannaSearch Cannabis Career and Education Fair Slated For Sept. 14

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CannaSearch, which is being billed as the nation's first and largest cannabis career and educational fair is scheduled for Denver on September 16.

CannaSearch, LLC says it designed the event to help match career seekers with cannabis employers from all over the United States.

"Currently, we are observing numerous states preparing for cannabis business and are seeing companies become increasingly more sophisticated around the hiring process," said Todd Mitchem, co-organizer of the event. "This includes a desire to hire more employees for traditional career roles such as management, retail, sales, marketing, accounting, IT, quality control, administration and horticulture."

"The added educational component to this job fair was designed to guide job seekers who lack understanding of what it takes to work in this budding industry," Mitchem said (nice pun, by the way). "Participants will be able to sit in on one-hour presentations, which will cover a broad range of topics spanning from bud tending to executive leadership advice."

CannaSearch says it is "securing 50 of the country's top cannabis brands as well as a collection of major sponsors" who will participate in the event, which, the company says, is "a project that is certain to gain global attention."

Oregon: Taxpayers Paying For Anti-Marijuana Campaign Just Before Legalization Vote

KevinSabetSAM

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An opposition campaign to Oregon's Measure 91 marijuana legalization initiative is taking shape -- and it's being funded with taxpayer money.

You'd think voting on a public policy initiative wouldn't require tax money to advocate one side or the other; after all, the voters are supposed to be able to decide for themselves on questions like cannabis legalization, without having to fund the "no" sign of things. But a taxpayer-funded tour will usher notorious anti-pot zealot Kevin Sabet on a 13-city tour around the state, reports Kate Willson at Willamette Week.

Sabet, on his taxpayer-funded tour, will be spreading ridiculous "reefer madness" myths and outright lies about cannabis around Oregon. Do you feel as if you're getting your money's worth, Oregon taxpayers?

A recent poll showed eight of 10 Oregonians believe it's a matter of when, not if, marijuana is legalized. Many of them believe that will happen on November 4, when pot legalization initiative Measure 91 appears on the ballot.

Measure 91 enjoys support from donors and middle-of-the-road endorsements, including from a retired Oregon Supreme Court judge and the City Club of Portland; it's similar to measures that voters in Colorado and Washington approved two years ago. New Approach Oregon, the pro-Measure 91 campaign, has already spent $1.1 million, and the group announced this week it'll be spending an additional $2.3 million on TV ads.

Oregon: Sociologist Says Policy Will Determine Economic Impact of Legal Marijuana

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The economic impact of legalizing marijuana in Oregon is difficult to estimate because the potential market will depend in large part on what kind of policies would be adopted if a proposed ballot measure passes in November, according to an Oregon State University sociologist who studies the issue.

“Marijuana is already a serious economic force in Oregon,” said Seth Crawford, an expert on the policies and market structure of marijuana in Oregon. “When you consider the proposed excise tax and additional revenue from income taxes, it could become a sizeable income stream for the state.”

Oregon voters will decide in November whether to legalize recreational marijuana production and use. Policymakers are trying to determine the economic impact of legalizing marijuana and Crawford’s research was recently cited in an economic report commissioned by backers of the ballot initiative, as well as by the state legislative revenue office.

If marijuana is legalized in Oregon, the state could net anywhere from $35 million to $105 million in new tax revenue per year, Crawford estimated in research published earlier this year in the Humboldt Journal of Social Relations.

Washington: Seattle Cop Who Wrote 80% of Marijuana Tickets Returns To Duty

SeattlePoliceOfficerRandyJokela(80PercentOfPotTickets)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A bicycle officer who was briefly reassigned after it was discovered he had personally written 80 percent of the tickets for public marijuana use issued in the city this year has returned to his regular job, the Seattle Police Department announced Monday afternoon.

Police claim they're still investigating the conduct of Officer Randy Jokela, who has been with the force 24 years and who seems to be having real trouble adjusting to the implementation of I-502, the limited marijuana legalization measure approved by Washington state voters in 2012.

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole and Pierce Murphy, director of the SPD's Office of Professional Accountability, "conferred and ultimately decided that there was nothing that precludes this employee from returning to his normal duties," according to department spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb.d

While the department did not name their officer -- apparently they aren't all that proud of him -- Jokela, was identified by sources within the department as a patrolman who joined the force in 1990. He wrote 66 of 83 tickets for public use of marijuana issued in the first half of 2014, O'Toole said.

Colorado: Recreational Marijuana Dispensary Draws New Tourism To Pueblo Area

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Southern Colorado recreational marijuana dispensary Cannasseur has large customer base from surrounding states

Cannasseur, a recreational marijuana dispensary serving Southern Colorado, experienced a surge in out-of-state customers upon opening their doors in May, as their location in Pueblo West, Colorado is a mere hour and a half from the state border.

However, unlike many Colorado dispensaries that offer discounts to local patrons only, Cannasseur welcomes and embraces the tourism their business brings to the area.

“We’ve found that upwards of 80 percent of our revenue is coming from bordering states that have not yet legalized recreational marijuana,” said Ryan Griego, managing partner at Cannasseur. “We want these visitors to the dispensary to feel welcomed and at ease.”

Many of Cannasseur’s customers are from neighboring states to the south, west and east including Oklahoma, Kansas and Utah, with the largest factions coming from Northwest Texas, Albuquerque and Santa Fe.

Cannasseur anticipates that the Colorado State Fair (August 22-September 1) will draw even more tourists to the Pueblo area, many of whom will visit the dispensary.

This comes as no surprise to Griego who made sure that Cannasseur’s business model has a heavy emphasis on customer service, highly educated staff members and a relaxing, inviting environment.

Washington: Seattle's Second Recreational Marijuana Store Opens

HerbalNation(logo)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

For almost six weeks now, Seattle's lone recreational marijuana store, Cannabis City, has struggling to stay open, repeatedly running out of legal cannabis priced around $25 a gram. Now, a second pot store, Herbal Nation, has finally opened in the Emerald City.

The new state-licensed marijuana store, at 19302 Bothell Everett Highway in Seattle, held its grand opening on Monday, and staff said they believe they have enough weed to stay open seven days a week, reports Jake Ellison at the Seattle PI.

"Judging by the initial line at opening, there will be plenty of folks trying to run 'em dry," Ellison reports.

"It's a very exciting day for us, but it's more of an exciting day for the community," said Lauren Downes, spokeswoman for Herbal Nation. "Washington state voted this in and we feel privileged to be in the position that we're in.

"We do not consider ourselves to just be retailers of cannabis," Downes said. "We are here to set a standard in the industry, and implement positive change and evolution in the recreational cannabis industry."

Maine: South Portland City Council Places Marijuana Legalization Measure On Ballot

DavidBoyerCitizensForASaferMaine

Similar proposals are also likely to appear on ballots in Lewiston and York

The South Portland City Council on Monday voted unanimously to place a measure on the November ballot that would make private marijuana possession legal for adults within city limits.

Citizens for a Safer Maine collected more than 1,500 signatures to get the measure in front of the council, which had the options of adopting it or placing it on the ballot. Just 959 valid signatures of registered city voters were required. A similar measure has qualified for the ballot in Lewiston, and Citizens for a Safer Maine is in the process of collecting the final signatures needed to place one on the ballot in York.

The South Portland initiative would make it legal for adults 21 years of age and older to privately possess up to one ounce of marijuana. It would remain illegal to consume or display marijuana in public. The measure also includes a statement in support of regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol at the state level.

“Voters will have the chance to take a bite out of marijuana prohibition in South Portland this November,” said Marijuana Policy Project Maine political director David Boyer. “This is a great opportunity to have an open and honest public dialogue about this important issue. In particular, we hope to continue the conversation about the relative safety of marijuana compared to alcohol.

Oregon: Addiction Expert Kicks Off $2.3 Million Marijuana Legalization Ad Campaign

RichardHarris

Oregon's leading drug addiction expert kicks off $2.3 million marijuana ad campaign

Largest ad buy so far for 2014 Oregon ballot measures

Oregon's leading drug addiction expert appears on Monday in the first TV spot in a $2.3 million advertising campaign to regulate, tax and legalize marijuana for adults 21 and older.

The advertising buy made by the Yes on 91 campaign is the largest so far for a 2014 Oregon ballot measure.

The first TV advertisement features Richard Harris. As the former director of Addictions and Mental Health Services for the state of Oregon, he held the highest position in the state for directing drug treatment and addiction programs. He is volunteering with the campaign.

The ad, in which Harris calls marijuana "a pretty benign drug," will run on television stations throughout Oregon. The Yes on 91 campaign also has several ads running on pre-roll online. (You can view the Harris ad, which is on YouTube, at the bottom of this article.)

"Criminalizing marijuana ruins lives and wastes resources," Harris said. "Instead of sending people to jail and turning them into hardened criminals, we should treat marijuana as a public health issue and create a system that raises money for prevention programs and mental health programs.

"Right now, there is no state appropriated money in Oregon for drug and alcohol prevention programs, including for marijuana, but Measure 91 would change that," Harris said.

Maine: South Portland Council To Consider Marijuana Legalization Measure

DavidBoyerCitizensForASaferMaine

The South Portland City Council will consider a citizen-initiated measure at its meeting Monday night that would make private marijuana possession legal for adults. The council can enact the proposed law or place it on the ballot.

Citizens for a Safer Maine submitted more than 1,500 signatures to place the measure in front of the council. Just 959 valid signatures of registered city voters were required.

Citizens for a Safer Maine qualified a similar measure for the ballot in Lewiston, and it is in the process of collecting the final signatures needed to place one on the ballot in York.

The initiative would make it legal for adults 21 years of age and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana. It would remain illegal to consume or display marijuana in public.

The measure also includes a statement in support of regulating and taxing marijuana like alcohol at the state level.

“This is a common-sense proposal,” said Marijuana Policy Project Maine political director David Boyer. “Adults who are of legal age to use alcohol should not be punished simply for consuming a far less harmful substance.

"We hope the council members will agree law enforcement officials’ time and resources would be better spent addressing serious crimes,” Boyer said.

WHAT: South Portland City Council hearing on a citizen-initiated measure that would make private marijuana possession legal for adults

WHEN: Monday, August 18, 7 p.m. ET

WHERE: South Portland City Hall, 25 Cottage Rd., South Portland

Oregon: Vote Yes on Measure 91

Measure 91

By D. Paul Stanford, CRRH

Oregon's Ballot Measure 91 qualified for the vote on July 22nd, almost exactly two weeks after Washington state began regulated sales of marijuana just across the mighty Columbia River from Oregon. New Approach Oregon's petition campaign turned in enough valid signatures to qualify the Control, Regulation, and Taxation of Marijuana and Industrial Hemp Act for the November 4, 2014 ballot. On the same day in November, both the state of Alaska and the federal capitol, Washington, DC, will also vote on their own initiative petitions to end marijuana prohibition.

According to the Oregon Secretary of State's website, 145,030 unverified signatures were submitted for verification on Measure 91. Of those, 88,584 signatures, or 64.41 percent of the 135,722 accepted for verification, were valid. To qualify for the ballot, 87,213 were needed, so, according to the Oregon Secretary of State Elections Division, Measure 91 qualified with 1,371 more signatures than the minimum required..

The proposed Oregon ballot measure would allow for licensed and regulated cultivation and sales of marijuana. Sales would be taxed to generate money for schools, state and local police and drug treatment, prevention and mental health programs.

It is important for medical marijuana patients to note that Measure 91, when passed, will not change nor effect the current medical marijuana law in Oregon. Measure 91 taxes will not be charged for people with an Oregon medical marijuana permit.

Colorado: Company Announces Development of Marijuana Pizza

UniquePizzaAndSubs(logo)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana, it seems, often leads to pizza. Now at least one company is cutting to the chase and combining the two.

Unique Pizza and Subs Corporation on Tuesday announced it will "explore the possibility" of developing a signature Unique Pizza with cannabis infused into it.

The company said it believes, with the increasing demand for marijuana in Colorado under legalization, "it would utilize Dr. Reddy's world renowned skills, laboratories and test kitchen to develop a signature line of marijuana enhanced Unique Pizzas, that could be sold at adult bars and night clubs throughout the state."

"Utilizing Dr. Reddy's superior scientific technology affords the company a Unique opportunity to explore the various possibilities in the fast growing marijuana industry," the company's prepared statement reads.

After the legalization of cannabis, Colorado began the testing of marijuana edible products on May 1, putting the state in the developmental forefront of the industry.

"Unique Pizza would like to be on the vanguard of the hot and ready edible cannabis industry and believe that bringing together Dr. Reddy's superior scientific skills with Unique Pizza's industry leading gourmet taste is the perfect blend of flavors to lead this new frontier," the press release reads.

Colorado: The Green Joint Recreational Marijuana Dispensary Opens In Glenwood Springs

TheGreenJoint-GlenwoodSpringsCO

The Green Joint, a recreational marijuana dispensary in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, opened its doors to the pot-loving masses on August 1. Owned by locals Cheryl and Dan Sullivan, The Green Joint is the third recreational marijuana shop to open in Glenwood Springs since recreational weed became legal January 1.

The Sullivans have served the greater Roaring Fork Valley for the last five years with Green Medicine Wellness, a medical marijuana dispensary, and now the Green Joint and Green Medicine Wellness operate out of the same appropriately green Victorian in the heart of Glenwood Springs.

“Bringing high quality recreational products to the masses has been a dream of ours for a long time,” said Dan. “We’ve seen visitors from France, the UK, and all over the U.S. in the short time that we’ve been open. It’s been incredible to see the excitement on the face of every customer that has walked through our door.”

Located at 1030 Grand Avenue in Glenwood Springs, The Green Joint offers a central
location and a discreet, comfortable atmosphere, according to Sullivan. Recreational patrons are greeted upon entry and can browse the marijuana selection upstairs in a relaxed setting (medical customers stay on the main level).

Guests can make themselves at home on couches if there is a wait, and everyone from weed veterans to weed novices are encouraged to ask questions and learn about favorite strains and different offerings at The Green Joint.

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